Biography of

James Ward Price

 

Born 21 Nov 1868, Monterey, VA
Died 07 May 1946
Married 1894, Lura Ann Sharp

 

James Ward Price entered Baltimore Medical College, now the medical department of the University of Maryland, from which he was graduated in 1891, after which for a time he was resident physician of the Maryland General Hospital and attended some post-graduate lectures at Johns Hopkins. Doctor Price had always maintained his home at Marlinton. He had been quite active in the political field as a Republican, the only member of his family of this political faith, and in 1904 was elected a member of the State Legislature. He was the author of several important bills, and one of these, a state dispensary bill for the control of liquor, created wide discussion.

 

Children Born
William L. Price  
Julia L Doctor Price  

James Ward Price

References

James W. Price was born at Monterey, Virginia, November 21, 1868, but was reared at Marlinton, West Virginia, and was primarily educated by his parents. When he had determined on his future career he entered Baltimore Medical College, now the medical department of the University of Maryland, from which he was graduated in 1891, after which for a time he was resident physician of the Maryland General Hospital and attended some post-graduate lectures at Johns Hopkins. Doctor Price has always maintained his home at Marlinton. He has been quite active in the political field as a republican, the only member of his family of this political faith, and in 1904 was elected a member of the State Legislature. He was the author of several important bills, and one of these, a state dispensary bill for the control of liquor, created wide discussion.

In 1894 Doctor Price married Miss Lura A. Sharp, of Edray, West Virginia, and they have two children: William L. and Julia L. Doctor Price and his family are Presbyterians, and he belongs to the Masonic fraternity. During the World war his attitude was that of a loyal and patriotic citizen. He wag a member of the Volunteer Medical Corps,
and was chairman of the County Board of National Defense. During the latter years of his life the father of Doctor Price took great pride in preparing a history of Pocahontas County, which was published by his sons, and which will, as years go by, prove incalculable worth to historians. Another of his published works, entitled "On
to Grafton," a reproduction of his diary, is a valuable contribution to historical data.

From "The Durbin Route" by William Price McNeel James W. Price is mentioned as the story of "Blindness" regarding Elihu Robinson, oldest man in point of service of the Greenbrier Divison of the C&O R&R.  Page 126.
James W. Price was born at Monterey, Virginia, November 21, 1868, but was reared at Marlinton, West Virginia, and was primarily educated by his parents. When he had determined on his future career he entered Baltimore Medical College, now the medical department of the University of Maryland, from which he was graduated in 1891, after which for a time he was resident physician of the Maryland General Hospital and attended some post-graduate lectures at Johns Hopkins. Doctor Price has always maintained his home at Marlinton. He has been quite active in the political field as a republican, the only member of his family of this political faith, and in 1904 was elected a member of the State Legislature. He was the author of several important bills, and one of these, a state dispensary bill for the control of liquor, created wide discussion.

In 1894 Doctor Price married Miss Lura A. Sharp, of Edray, West Virginia, and they have two children: William L. and Julia L. Doctor Price and his family are Presbyterians, and he belongs to the Masonic fraternity. During the World war his attitude was that of a loyal and patriotic citizen. He wag a member of the Volunteer Medical Corps, and was chairman of the County Board of National Defense. During the latter years of his life the father of Doctor Price took great pride in preparing a history of Pocahontas County, which was published by his sons, and which will, as years go by, prove incalculable worth to historians. Another of his published works, entitled "On to Grafton," a reproduction of his diary, is a valuable contribution to historical data.